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SC Fruit and Vegetable Field Report November 23, 2020

Coastal Region

Rob Last reports, “Strawberry crops continue to develop well with minimal pest and disease pressure so far. Fall vegetables are progressing towards the market. We continue to see pest pressure from caterpillars, and a few isolated aphids have been spotted during scouting. As we progress towards the holiday season, scouting of crops remains of vital importance to catch insect infestation and disease progression early for treatments to be effective.”

Graffiti cauliflower almost ready to harvest. Zack Snipes, ©2020, Clemson Extension

Graffiti cauliflower almost ready to harvest.
Zack Snipes, ©2020, Clemson Extension

Zack Snipes reports, “The week of wet weather two weeks prior prevented folks from getting out in the fields to spray for insects. I am seeing lots and lots of worm damage, particularly the diamondback moth. We need to get ahead of this pest so that we have good looking greens for the New Year’s Market. The strawberry crops look okay so far this season. The warm weather has really helped later seeded/transplanted crops. I am seeing some die off/rot in root crops in lower-lying areas of fields.”

Midlands Region

Justin Ballew reports, “Temperatures got a little cooler last week, with frost showing up in some low lying areas, mostly north of Columbia. The early season growth of strawberries has been impressive so far. As warm as it’s been this fall, early-season row covers probably will not be necessary this year unless plants were transplanted late. Caterpillar population size and damage seems to be on the rise in brassicas.

We’ve had good early season strawberry growth so far. Justin Ballew, ©2020, Clemson Extension

We’ve had good early season strawberry growth so far.
Justin Ballew, ©2020, Clemson Extension

How many diamondback moth caterpillars and pupae can you count on this leaf? This is a key reason why weekly scouting, timely spraying, proper insecticide rotation, and avoiding broad spectrum insecticides for caterpillar control are so important. Justin Ballew, ©2020, Clemson Extension

How many diamondback moth caterpillars and pupae can you count on this leaf? This is a key reason why weekly scouting, timely spraying, proper insecticide rotation, and avoiding broad spectrum insecticides for caterpillar control are so important.
Justin Ballew, ©2020, Clemson Extension

Pee Dee Region

Tony Melton reports, “Still a lot of sweet potatoes in the ground.  The bacterial diseases (Xanthomonas and Pseudomonas) on greens are raging havoc.  Rotation is the best control I have found.  I hate swinecress when it comes to greens -it takes over.  Yellow margined beetle is getting worse in  greens and spreading all over the state – Imidacloprid is a good control without killing beneficial insects.”

Upstate Region

Kerrie Roach reports, “Things have certainly slowed down in the field the last few weeks. Apples are mostly finished for the season with ‘Arkansas Black’ being the last variety to be picked. Most growers will keep roadside markets open until Thanksgiving and then call it a quits for the season. Now begins the prep for next year with educational meetings, pesticide certification credits, soil testing, land prep and more.”

If this document didn’t answer your questions, please contact HGIC at hgic@clemson.edu or 1-888-656-9988.

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