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Pollinator Gardens- Plants with a Purpose

I have become increasingly interested in pollinator gardening over the years. And while the beauty the flowers bring to my life should be enough, in reality, I am more entertained by the birds, bees, and butterflies they attract.

Gulf Fritillary on Lantana ‘Mozelle’.

Gulf Fritillary on Lantana ‘Mozelle’.
Millie Davenport, ©2021, HGIC, Clemson Extension

Each year, I find myself wanting to add plants that will provide nectar, pollen, and shelter to attract more natural entertainment to my yard. I like to think that I plant my pollinator beds to benefit JUST the pollinators, but deep down, I know I do it for my own selfish reasons. BUT I suppose it is a win, win for us both, right? Even my dog, Dahlia, enjoys watching the insects flitter about among the flowers.

Even my dog, Dahlia, enjoys watching the insects flitter about among the flowers.

Even my dog, Dahlia, enjoys watching the insects flitter about among the flowers.
Millie Davenport, ©2021, HGIC, Clemson Extension

If you love watching pollinators in your landscape as much as I do, be sure to plant for all three growing seasons. Here, in mid-October, the lantana and old-fashioned mums in my garden are alive with butterfly and bee activity. But beware, adding pollinator plants to your landscape may turn you into a pollinator addict like me, haha! For more information on pollinator gardens, see HGIC 1727, Pollinator Gardening.

Monarch Butterfly on Lantana ‘Mozelle’.

Monarch Butterfly on Lantana ‘Mozelle’.
Millie Davenport, ©2021, HGIC, Clemson Extension

Bee on old-fashioned garden mum ‘Ryan’s Apricot’.

Bee on old-fashioned garden mum ‘Ryan’s Apricot’.
Millie Davenport, ©2021, HGIC, Clemson Extension

If this document didn’t answer your questions, please contact HGIC at hgic@clemson.edu or 1-888-656-9988.

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