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SC Fruit and Vegetable Field Report March 1, 2021

Coastal Region

Rob Last reports, “Following a few days of warmer conditions, crops are moving on strongly. Flowering and fruit set is occurring in strawberry crops. At present, spider mites in treated crops are at very low populations, but with warmer weather, populations can increase rapidly. As we are entering flowering and fruit set, sanitation and fungicide applications will be required to keep gray mold managed. Remember to rotate FRAC codes to avoid resistance build-up. Fertigation is being applied, and it will be well worthwhile taking a tissue test from crops. Blueberries in the area are showing bud swell with early varieties showing open flower.”

Zack Snipes reports, “With the warm and DRY weather last week and for most of the week this week, farmers have been able to get out and work in the fields. Spring crops are going in the ground where it is dry enough to plant. The warm weather this past week and this coming week will probably push 2020 brassicas to bolt (flower). If you have any left in the fields, it might be best to get them out as soon as possible. Stay on top of sanitation for berries, and it’s time to start fertigating them if you haven’t started that already.”

Warm weather can cause collards that have grown through the winter to bolt (flower). This plant is just beginning to develop a flower head. Zack Snipes, ©2021, Clemson Extension

Warm weather can cause collards that have grown through the winter to bolt (flower). This plant is just beginning to develop a flower head.
Zack Snipes, ©2021, Clemson Extension

Midlands Region

Justin Ballew reports, “We had several beautiful, warm days last week. Strawberry growers used that opportunity to pull the row covers off the fields, allowing the plants to catch some rays. Growth is starting to pick up, and I’m seeing a good many blooms. The weather conditions are favorable now for Botrytis development (high moisture and temps in the 60s-70s), so we need to begin protecting our blooms with preventative fungicide sprays. Check out this great video put together by Dr. Guido Schnabel’s former student Madeline Dowling for a refresher on the Botrytis life cycle. Download the MyIPM app for more disease and fungicide information. Now is also a good time to start tissue sampling to make sure we’re fertigating the right amounts of nutrients.

Starting to see plenty of blooms on the strawberries around the midlands. Justin Ballew, ©2021, Clemson Extension

Starting to see plenty of blooms on the strawberries around the midlands.
Justin Ballew, ©2021, Clemson Extension

This dead flower is already developing Botrytis spores. Spore development is high when temperatures are in the 60 to 70-degree range and moisture is high. Start protecting blooms now. Justin Ballew, ©2021, Clemson Extension

This dead flower is already developing Botrytis spores. Spore development is high when temperatures are in the 60 to 70-degree range and moisture is high. Start protecting blooms now.
Justin Ballew, ©2021, Clemson Extension

Sarah Scott reports, “Growers took advantage of some sunny, dry weather and continued to apply copper and dormant oil sprays in peach fields to combat potential bacterial spot issues, as well as scale in the coming season. Pruning and orchard floor management continue as well as some late planting due to wet field conditions. Strawberries have been covered to give them a pre-season push. Some mite issues are present but under control.”

Workers apply a dormant oil application on peach field in Edgefield Co. Sarah Scott. ©2021, Clemson Extension

Workers apply a dormant oil application on peach field in Edgefield Co.
Sarah Scott. ©2021, Clemson Extension

Upstate Region

Kerrie Roach reports, “Growers are working between the rains to finish up pruning. The SC Apple Grower meeting was held on Thursday afternoon virtually with lots of great presentations and discussions. During the meeting, Dr. Mike Parker (NCSU) mentioned the distinct difference in apple and peach pruning, and how using the same crews can sometimes lead to problems. Peaches fruit laterally along the limbs, which means heading cuts (pruning off the tip of a branch) is the common and acceptable practice.  Whereas apple trees fruit terminally, so heading cuts could potentially remove a significant amount of potential fruit. Make sure crews are well aware of the difference!”

Pruning apples at Hollifield’s Orchard with pneumatic pruners. Kerrie Roach, ©2021, Clemson Extension

Pruning apples at Hollifield’s Orchard with pneumatic pruners.
Kerrie Roach, ©2021, Clemson Extension

If this document didn’t answer your questions, please contact HGIC at hgic@clemson.edu or 1-888-656-9988.

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