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SC Fruit and Vegetable Field Report November 15, 2021

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Coastal Region

Rob Last reports, “Crops in the area are developing well, with few disease problems. In brassica crops, we are still seeing increased insect pressure from diamondback moths and whiteflies. Please remember to rotate insecticides with different modes of action. Following cooler weather, some brassicas are displaying some reddening to the leaves. This phenomenon often concerns the plant closing down phosphorous uptake. It is not necessarily indicative of a phosphorous deficiency in the soil. Generally speaking, the plants will ‘green up” as the temperatures increase.”

Midlands

Justin Ballew reports, “It was a little warmer last week, though we had some cool nights. We got a little rain (.3” at my house), and we could use more. Strawberries are continuing to get established and are looking decent so far. Some folks have opted to cover their plants for a couple of weeks to accumulate more growing degree days. I’m glad to see that since we planted late, and it’s been cool. I’ve already seen some deer feeding damage. It doesn’t take them long to find the plants once new leaves start growing. Get fencing in place before deer feeding begins. I don’t know of any repellants that work as well as a fence.”

This plant just barely had enough time to push out a couple of new leaves before the deer found it.

This plant just barely had enough time to push out a couple of new leaves before the deer found it.
Justin Ballew, ©2021. Clemson Extension

Sarah Scott reports, “We’ve had some areas of patchy frost just as some of the crops like eggplant and bell peppers are starting to wind down. Broccoli harvest is wrapping up, and this season turned out to be a good one. Fumigation has been done on fields where new peach trees will be planted, and growers are plowing and preparing for planting. ”

Broccoli that is ready for harvest.

Broccoli that is ready for harvest.
Sarah Scott, ©2021. Clemson Extension

Peach trees with fall color.

Peach trees with fall color.
Sarah Scott, ©2021. Clemson Extension

Cover crops in between rows to be hilled for new peach plantings.

Cover crops in between rows to be hilled for new peach plantings.
Sarah Scott, ©2021, Clemson Extension

Upstate

Kerrie Roach reports, “With the first real cold nights over the weekend, things have officially begun to crawl as far as production is concerned. However, soil sampling, land preparation, and winter chores have started off with a bang. This is a great time to get things going with soil sampling. Results are typically available within 2 weeks, and adjustments can be started and made in time for planting. Check out the Clemson site for information, or contact your county agent for help!”

Andy Rollins reports, “I am still in the process of inspecting all upstate strawberry plantings for this new year of production. Plants should have leaves with three leaflets (like clover). Occasionally, you may find one plant here or there with four leaflets, and this is within reason. You should not be finding nearly every plant with this abnormal growth. There can be several issues that can cause this. The use of runner stimulating hormones by plant producers and phytoplasmas (a type of bacteria) can also cause this effect. I have only found this problem on ‘Camino Real’ on one farm this year, but I am looking everywhere.  In a previous year, when this was found, we later had deformed berries that looked more like a mangled up leaf than a strawberry. We have had some more root rot issues in fall crops, and we are preparing new ground for peach plantings now.”

Strawberry leaves with 4 leaflets are ok if seen occasionally, but it is not normal to see this on every plant.

Strawberry leaves with 4 leaflets are ok if seen occasionally, but it is not normal to see this on every plant.
Andy Rollins, ©2021, Clemson Extension

If this document didn’t answer your questions, please contact HGIC at hgic@clemson.edu or 1-888-656-9988.

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