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SC Fruit and Vegetable Field Report – November 29, 2021

Coastal Region

Rob Last reports, “In our area, pest and disease pressure have reduced in response to cooler dryer conditions. Keep an eye on soil moisture and continue to regularly scout crops.”

Midlands Region

Justin Ballew reports, “We had a couple of good freezes over the past week that took out the remaining fall cucurbits, tomatoes, and peppers. Strawberries are doing well, considering we were late planting, and we haven’t accumulated many growing degree days (GDD) over the last few weeks. I’m not seeing any spider mites yet, and it has been quite dry, so I’m not seeing any disease either. For anyone using row covers right now, this week looks to be a little warmer, so it would be a good time to take the covers off and let the plants get more light. Research from NC State suggests we only want to keep row covers on for about two weeks in the fall.”

Strawberries are looking pretty good, considering the cool weather and being planted a little late.

Strawberries are looking pretty good, considering the cool weather and being planted a little late.
Justin Ballew, ©2021, Clemson Extension

Sarah Scott reports, “We had some really cold temperatures last week, and Tuesday night finally froze out any remaining warm-weather crops. Land has been fumigated and plowed for new peach crop plantings. Strawberries are coming along nicely.”

Pee Dee Region

Bruce McLean reports, “Fall vegetable crops are continuing to look good with few problems. Stink bugs are still lingering around, and diamondback moths are just starting to become prevalent. Be sure to scout weekly and spray accordingly. Strawberries are a little behind where they should be. This is due to a somewhat late planting for much of the crop and the onset of somewhat cooler temperatures. Some growers are trying to push the strawberry crop by managing them with row covers. Other than that, the strawberry crop seems to be well established and starting to grow. Perennial fruit crops (blueberries, blackberries, muscadines, peaches, etc.) seem to be defoliating well and going into dormancy. Be sure not to begin winter pruning until the plants have reached full dormancy. Looking at the long-range weather forecast, sometime after the first of the year will likely be a good time to begin.”

Well-maintained field of mixed brassicas. No herbicide applied, just cold steel (a sharp hoe and well-timed passes with the cultivator).

Well-maintained field of mixed brassicas. No herbicide applied, just cold steel (a sharp hoe and well-timed passes with the cultivator).
Bruce McLean, ©2021, Clemson Extension

Butterbean planting at the Pee Dee Research and Education Center is loaded up with a crop and ready to defoliate. Harvest will begin in about a week to 10 days.

Butterbean planting at the Pee Dee Research and Education Center is loaded up with a crop and ready to defoliate. Harvest will begin in about a week to 10 days.
Bruce McLean, ©2021, Clemson Extension

If this document didn’t answer your questions, please contact HGIC at hgic@clemson.edu or 1-888-656-9988.

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