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Colonial Inspired Apple Candle Holder

Decorating the house with fresh greenery and fruit is one of the oldest winter holiday traditions. Evergreens have been a part of winter festivals since ancient times. They are used to represent everlasting life and hope for the return of spring.

The first and often the best place to look for holiday greenery may be in your landscape. Greenery gathered from your garden will be far fresher than any that you can buy. You may also have a variety of unusual greenery that would be difficult to find for purchase.

When gathering live greenery from your shrubs and trees, remember that you are pruning the plants. Consider carefully which branches to cut and which ones to leave. Distribute the cuts evenly around the plant to preserve its natural form.

Apple candle holders date back to Colonial times. In a few easy steps, you can make a beautiful arrangement for your dining room table.

Apple candle holders date back to Colonial times. Barbara H. Smith, ©2020 HGIC, Clemson University

Apple candle holders date back to Colonial times.
Barbara H. Smith, ©2020 HGIC, Clemson University

Here is a list of what you will need:

  • Apples (I prefer Granny Smith apples as they have a smooth base and for color contrast.)
  • Sharp knife or apple corer
  • Lemon juice
  • Candles
  • Sharpie marker or another marking device
  • Hand pruners or sharp scissors
  • A selection of greenery, berries, and dried flowers

Instructions:

  1. Remove the stem from the apple
  2. Using the marker, trace the circumference of the bottom of the candle in the center of the apple.
  3. Use the knife or apple corer to cut out the center of the apple to create the holder for the candle.
  4. Rub the inside of the apple with lemon juice to prevent browning.
  5. Insert the candle. If necessary, drip some candle wax around the base of the candle to hold it in place.
  6. Decorate around the candle base with a combination of greenery, berries, and dried flowers. Cut the stems at a 45-degree angle to help in inserting the greenery into the apple.

Apple candle holders date back to Colonial times. Barbara H. Smith, ©2020 HGIC, Clemson University

Apple candle holders date back to Colonial times.
Barbara H. Smith, ©2020 HGIC, Clemson University

Supplies needed to make a Colonial apple holder for the holiday table. Barbara H. Smith, ©2020 HGIC, Clemson University

Supplies needed to make a Colonial apple holder for the holiday table.
Barbara H. Smith, ©2020 HGIC, Clemson University

Use a marker to trace the circumference of the candle base in the center of the apple. Barbara H. Smith, ©2020 HGIC, Clemson University

Use a marker to trace the circumference of the candle base in the center of the apple.
Barbara H. Smith, ©2020 HGIC, Clemson University

Cut out the center of the apple with a sharp knife or apple corer. Rub the inside of the cutout area with lemon juice to help prevent browning. Barbara H. Smith, ©2020 HGIC, Clemson University

Cut out the center of the apple with a sharp knife or apple corer. Rub the inside of the cutout area with lemon juice to help prevent browning.
Barbara H. Smith, ©2020 HGIC, Clemson University

Cut the stems at a 45-degree angle to help in inserting the greenery into the apple. Barbara H. Smith, ©2020 HGIC, Clemson University

Cut the stems at a 45-degree angle to help in inserting the greenery into the apple.
Barbara H. Smith, ©2020 HGIC, Clemson University

The apple candle holders are now ready for display in your home. Barbara H. Smith, ©2020 HGIC, Clemson University

The apple candle holders are now ready for display in your home.
Barbara H. Smith, ©2020 HGIC, Clemson University

If this document didn’t answer your questions, please contact HGIC at hgic@clemson.edu or 1-888-656-9988.

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