COVID-19 Extension Updates and Resources ... More Information »

Close message window

How to Make a Dried Hydrangea Wreath

One of my favorite native hydrangeas to use in the landscape is Annabelle Hydrangea (Hydrangea arborescens ‘Annabelle’). It is best grown in morning sun and afternoon shade. The white flowers bloom in late May through June on new growth. Prune it back in the late winter or early spring before the new growth emerges to encourage heavier flowering. After the white flowers fade and begin to dry, they turn a soft green color.

Annabelle Hydrangea (Hydrangea arborescens ‘Annabelle’) white flowers bloom in late May through June on new plant growth. Barbara H. Smith, ©2021 HGIC, Clemson University

Annabelle Hydrangea (Hydrangea arborescens ‘Annabelle’) white flowers bloom in late May through June on new plant growth.
Barbara H. Smith, ©2021 HGIC, Clemson University

As the flowers fade and begin to dry, they turn a soft green color. Barbara H. Smith, ©2021 HGIC, Clemson University

As the flowers fade and begin to dry, they turn a soft green color.
Barbara H. Smith, ©2021 HGIC, Clemson University

While the flowers and stems are still pliable, I cut and arrange the hydrangeas on a grape vine form to make a beautiful wreath. The blooms will eventually dry to a greenish-ecru color.

Use a purchased grape vine wreath form to insert the hydrangea stems to form your wreath. Barbara H. Smith, ©2021 HGIC, Clemson University

Use a purchased grape vine wreath form to insert the hydrangea stems to form your wreath.
Barbara H. Smith, ©2021 HGIC, Clemson University

While the flowers and stems are still pliable, cut the stems about 4 to 6 inches long and work them into the wreath form. Barbara H. Smith, ©2021 HGIC, Clemson University

While the flowers and stems are still pliable, cut the stems about 4 to 6 inches long and work them into the wreath form.
Barbara H. Smith, ©2021 HGIC, Clemson University

When the flowers are totally dry, I spray the wreath with a clear acrylic to help keep the fragile flowers from shattering. Hair spray will also work. Just be sure to spray the acrylic or hair spray out-of-doors. When the spray is completely dry, your wreath is ready hang. If using it outside, be sure to hang it in a place that is protected from the elements.

After the acrylic spray or hair spray is completely dry, hang your beautiful wreath where you can enjoy it. Barbara H. Smith, ©2021 HGIC, Clemson University

After the acrylic spray or hair spray is completely dry, hang your beautiful wreath where you can enjoy it.
Barbara H. Smith, ©2021 HGIC, Clemson University

For more information on growing hydrangeas, see HGIC 1067, Hydrangea.

If this document didn’t answer your questions, please contact HGIC at hgic@clemson.edu or 1-888-656-9988.

Factsheet Number

Newsletter

Categories

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This